Andrea Califano

Andrea Califano

Titles

Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology
Chair, Department of Systems Biology
Director, JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center
Associate Director, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center

Affiliations

Department of Systems Biology
Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
Center for Multiscale Analysis of Genomic and Cellular Networks (MAGNet)
JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center
Department of Biomedical Informatics
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics

Executive Assistant:
Carolyn Williams
cw2449@columbia.edu


Andrea Califano is the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology in the Department of Systems Biology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics, and Biomedical Informatics at Columbia University Medical Center. He also serves as the Founding Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, Director of the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, and Associate Director for Bioinformatics of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center. After completing a doctoral thesis in physics at the University of Florence, Italy, Dr. Califano worked at the IBM TJ Watson Research Center, where he became involved in computational biology in 1990. In 1997 he became program director of the IBM Computational Biology Center. In 2000 he co-founded First Genetic Trust, Inc. to pursue translational genomics research. Finally, he joined Columbia in 2003.

The Califano Lab uses a combination of computational and experimental methodologies to reconstruct the regulatory logic of human cells in genome-wide fashion. He has shown that analysis of this logic can identify master regulator proteins responsible for human disease, including cancer and neurodegenerative syndromes, as well as for normal tissue development. In addition, his lab has developed methods for discovering compounds and compound combinations that can inactivate these proteins, thus providing valuable therapeutic strategies. These findings have been translated into several clinical studies, including a very innovative set of N-of-1 studies in which disease master regulators are identified and pharmacologically targeted on an individual patient basis, using a systems biology approach to precision medicine.

Dr. Califano is very active nationally, serving on numerous editorial and scientific advisory boards, including the Board of Scientific Advisors of the National Cancer Institute, St. Jude Children’s Hospital, The MIT Koch Cancer Center, Cancer Genetics Inc., and Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., among others. He has served as chair or co-chair of many international conferences and meetings, including the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR); the RECOMB-ISCB Conference on Regulatory and Systems Genomics, with DREAM Challenges; Keystone Conferences; as well as several special conferences of the AACR on genomics and cancer systems biology.

More News

News

Columbia Researchers Will Use Master Regulators to Reclassify Cancer Subtypes
The project aims to provide a catalog of pan-cancer subtypes that could identify biomarkers and therapeutic targets for specific kinds of tumors, and guide the next generation of precision medicine.
Algorithm Identifies Genetic Driver of Mesenchymal Glioblastoma
Combined with other tools developed in the Califano Lab, DIGGIT identified KLHL9 deletion as a cause of GBM. The algorithm offers a new method for identifying genetic drivers of disease.
Columbia Launches Initiative to Advance Personalized Medicine
The Spring 2014 issue of Columbia Medicine reports on a university-wide project to identify more patient-specific ways to diagnose and treat disease, and the key role the Department of Systems Biology is playing in this effort.
Synergy between Two Genes Drives Aggressive Prostate Cancer
Using a new computational method for comparing regulatory networks in human cancer cells with those in a mouse model, researchers found that FOXM1 and CENPF together drive the most lethal prostate tumors.
Synthetic and Systems Biology: Reinventing the Code of Life
In video of this roundtable discussion at the Helix Center, professors Saeed Tavazoie and Andrea Califano join a panel of experts in discussing the intersection of systems and synthetic biology, and the role these two disciplines will play in the biological sciences.
Target Identified for Reversing Drug Resistance in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
By combining computational modeling with extensive laboratory tests, researchers determined that the protein kinase AKT plays a crucial role in desensitizing tumor cells to an important cancer therapy.
Biomarker Identified for Predicting Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness
Measurements of the expression levels of three genes associated with aging can be used to better assess which patients with indolent prostate cancer require treatment.
Clinical Trials for Cancer, One Patient at a Time
In an N-of-1 study, researchers at Columbia University use techniques from systems biology to analyze genomic information from an individual patient’s tumor to identify key genes, called master regulators, which, while not mutated, are necessary for the survival of cancer cells.
High-Throughput Screening and Chemistry Symposium
Learn about the Columbia Genome Center's capabilities in high-throughput screening and synthetic chemistry, and some recent research at Columbia that utilized these tools.
Study Supports Cell-of-Origin Model of Prostate Cancer Heterogeneity
The cell-of-origin model suggests that the aggressiveness of a tumor may result from the type of cell from which it arises. A new study has identified molecular signatures that hold potential as biomarkers of specific prostate cancer subtypes.
Progress in Chemical Systems Biology
Proceedings of the AACR Special Conference on Chemical Systems Biology spotlight new opportunities in cancer research at the interface of chemical biology and systems biology.
Vast Hidden Network Regulates Gene Expression in Cancer
Analysis of gene expression data in glioblastoma in combination with matched microRNA profiles uncovered a posttranscriptional regulation layer of surprising magnitude, comprising more than 248,000 microRNA (miR)-mediated interactions.