News

Autism Spectrum Disorders Genetic Network

Network of autism-associated genes. (Credit: Dennis Vitkup)

The following article is reposted with permission from the Columbia University Medical Center Newsroom. Find the original here.

People with autism have a wide range of symptoms, with no two people sharing the exact type and severity of behaviors. Now a large-scale analysis of hundreds of patients and nearly 1000 genes has started to uncover how diversity among traits can be traced to differences in patients’ genetic mutations. The study, conducted by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center, was published Dec. 22 in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Autism researchers have identified hundreds of genes that, when mutated, likely increase the risk of developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Much of the variability among people with ASD is thought to stem from the diversity of underlying genetic changes, including the specific genes mutated and the severity of the mutation.

“If we can understand how different mutations lead to different features of ASD, we may be able to use patients’ genetic profiles to develop accurate diagnostic and prognostic tools and perhaps personalize treatment,” said senior author Dennis Vitkup, PhD, associate professor of systems biology and biomedical informatics at Columbia University’s College of Physicians & Surgeons.

Sequence of genomic alterations in CLLA graph representing the sequence of genomic alterations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Each node represents a mutation, with arrows indicating temporal relationships between them. The size of the nodes indicates the number of patients in the study who exhibited the alteration, while the thickness of the lines shows how often the temporal relationships between nodes were seen. The method the researchers use enabled them to identify multiple, distinct evolutionary patterns in CLL.

As biologists have gained a better understanding of cancer, it has become clear that tumors are often driven not by a single mutation, but by a series of genetic changes that correspond to particular stages of cancer progression. In this sense, a tumor is constantly evolving, with different groups of cells that harbor distinctive mutations multiplying at different rates, depending on their fitness for particular disease states. As the search for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapies continues, one key question is how to disentangle the order in which mutations occur in order to understand how tumors change over time. Being able to predict how a tumor will behave based on signs seen early in the course of disease could enable the development of new diagnostics that could better inform treatment planning.

In a paper just published in the journal eLife, a team of investigators led by Department of Systems Biology Associate Professor Raul Rabadan reports on a new computational strategy for addressing this challenge. Their framework, called tumor evolutionary directed graphs (TEDG), considers next-generation sequencing data from tumor samples from a large number of patients. Using TEDG to analyze cancer cells in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), they were able to develop a model of how the disease’s mutational landscape changes from its initial onset to its late stages. Their findings suggest that CLL may not be just the result of a single evolutionary path, but can evolve in alternative ways.

Expanding the landscape of breast cancer drivers

In comparison with a previous study (Stephens et al., 2012, shown in gray), a new computational approach that focuses on somatic copy number mutations increased the number of known driver mutations in breast tumors to a median of five for each tumor. The findings could raise the likelihood of finding actionable targets in individual patients with breast cancer.

For many years, researchers have known that somatic copy number alterations (SCNA’s) — insertions, deletions, duplications, and transpositions of sections of DNA that are not inherited but occur after birth — play important roles in causing many types of cancer. Indeed, most recurrent drivers of epithelial tumors are copy number alterations, with some found in up to 40% of patients with specific tumor types. However, because SCNA’s occur when entire sections of chromosomes become damaged, biologists have had difficulty developing effective methods for distinguishing genes within SCNA’s that actually drive cancer from those genes that might lie near a driver but do not themselves cause disease.

Helios nearly doubled the number of high-confidence predictions of breast cancer drivers.

In a new paper published in Cell, researchers in the laboratories of Dana Pe’er (Columbia University Departments of Systems Biology and Biological Sciences) and Jose Silva (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) report on a new computational algorithm that promises to dramatically improve researchers’ ability to identify cancer-driving genes within potentially large SCNA’s. The algorithm, called Helios, was used to analyze a combination of genomic data and information generated by functional RNAi screens, enabling them to predict several dozen new SCNA drivers of breast cancer. In follow-up in vitro experimental studies, they tested 12 of these predictions, 10 of which were validated in the laboratory. Their findings nearly double the number of breast cancer drivers, providing many new opportunities towards personalized treatments for breast cancer. Their methodology is general and could also be used to locate disease-causing SCNA’s in other cancer types.

Leading this effort was Felix Sanchez-Garcia, a recent PhD graduate from the Pe’er Lab and a first author on the paper. The story of how this breakthrough came about illuminates how the interdisciplinary research and education that take place at the Department of Systems Biology can address important challenges facing biological and biomedical research.

Calendar

The Department of Systems Biology is pleased to announce the speakers in its 2014-2015 Seminar Series. The seminar series features leading investigators working in a diverse set of fields, including cancer genomics, systems biology, computational biology, human genetics, cancer biology, RNA splicing regulation, chromatin and cell signaling, and microfluidics and sequencing. Please save the dates!

All events will be held in the Department of Systems Biology Common Room (ICRC 816), unless indicated otherwise. Additional details about these events will be provided at the links below as they become available.

For a continually updated calendar of all Department of Systems Biology events, and to see an archive of past seminars, visit systemsbiology.columbia.edu/events.

DIGGIT identifies mutations upstream of master regulators.

A new algorithm called DIGGIT identifies mutations that lie upstream of crucial bottlenecks within regulatory networks. These bottlenecks, called master regulators, integrate these mutations and become essential functional drivers of diseases such as cancer.

Although genome-wide association studies have made it possible to identify mutations that are linked to diseases such as cancer, determining which mutations actually drive disease and the mechanics of how they do so has been an ongoing challenge. In a paper just published in Cell, researchers in the lab of Andrea Califano describe a new computational approach that may help address this problem.