News

M. Tuberculosis Culture

M. tuberculosis bacterial colonies. Photo credit: CDC/Dr. George Kubica [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Dennis Vitkup, an associate professor in the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology and Department of Biomedical Informatics, has  been awarded an R01 grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) to develop a computational pipeline for predicting bacterial metabolic networks. Building on a framework called GLOBUS that was previously developed in his lab, the project will produce probabilistic annotations of metabolic networks for all of the major bacterial species that cause disease in humans. It will both offer a method that can be used to study metabolism in any species of bacteria and produce valuable information that will aid researchers who are looking for therapies against many of the world’s most deadly pathogens.

Brent Stockwell Congratulations to Brent Stockwell, one of 10 recipients of the 2014 Lenfest Distinguished Teaching Awards. Dr. Stockwell is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biological Sciences, and a member of the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology.

Established through a donation by trustee Gerry Lenfest (Law '58), the Lenfest Award recognizes faculty who are not only accomplished scholars but also exhibit excellence in instruction and mentorship, as well as university citizenship and professional involvement. Each recipient of the Lenfest Award receives a prize of $25,000 for a three-year period and is recognized at the Lenfest Award dinner.

Chris Wiggins

In a “Most Creative People” feature, Fast Company magazine recently interviewed associate professor Chris Wiggins, a faculty member of the Department of Systems Biology and Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, about his new appointment at one of the world’s most respected outlets for digital journalism. In this role, he will lead the development of a machine learning team that will help the New York Times to better understand how its audience is using and navigating its content.

In the interview Dr. Wiggins explains why machine learning is becoming increasingly important in the age of big data, and about the shared challenges that the natural sciences and the media are now both facing.

Saeed Tavazoie

One of the defining features of systems biology has been its integration of computational and experimental methods for probing networks of molecular interactions. The research of Saeed Tavazoie, a professor in the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology, has been emblematic of this approach. After undergraduate studies in physics, he became fascinated by the processes that govern gene expression, particularly in understanding how gene expression is regulated by information encoded in the genome. Since then, his multidisciplinary approach to research has generated important insights into the principles that orchestrate genome regulation, as well as a number of novel algorithms and technologies for exploring this complex landscape.

In this conversation, Dr. Tavazoie discusses his research in the areas of gene transcription, post-transcriptional regulation, and molecular evolution, as well as some innovative technologies and experimental methods his lab has developed.

Peter SimsPeter Sims, an assistant professor in the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology, has been named Associate Director for Novel Technologies at the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center. In this role he will devise, direct, and implement strategies for incorporating new high-throughput experimental methods into the research done at the Genome Center.

Trained as a physical chemist, Dr. Sims has been developing a number of innovative technologies for studying single cells in a high-throughput setting. Using a type of microfluidics called soft lithography, his laboratory has designed a method for creating arrays composed of wells just tens of microns in diameter, small enough to isolate and perform high-throughput experiments on individual cells.  

Appointing Dr. Sims to his new role will enable the Columbia Genome Center to develop a variety of new applications that will benefit researchers across the Columbia University community.