News

Nathan Johns and Antonio Gomes

Nathan Johns and Antonio Gomes in the Wang Lab received this year's Distinguished Poster Award.

On June 5, 2015, approximately 150 faculty members, postdocs, and graduate students from the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology gathered at the Tappan Hill Mansion in Tarrytown, New York, for a day filled with illuminating presentations and conversations. The meeting has become a high point of the year for the Department, providing a relaxed environment to socialize and learn about some of the newest methods and discoveries emerging from other laboratories.

PhenoGraph

PhenoGraph, a new algorithm developed in Dana Pe'er's laboratory, proved capable of accurately identifying AML stem cells, reducing high-dimensional single cell mass cytometry data to an interpretable two-dimensional graph. Image courtesy of Dana Pe'er.

A key problem that has emerged from recent cancer research has been how to deal with the enormous heterogeneity found among the millions of cells that make up an individual tumor. Scientists now know that not all tumor cells are the same, even within an individual, and that these cells diversify into subpopulations, each of which has unique properties, or phenotypes. Of particular interest are cancer stem cells, which are typically resistant to existing cancer therapies and lead to relapse and recurrence of cancer following treatment. Finding better ways to distinguish and characterize cancer stem cells from other subpopulations of cancer cells has therefore become an important goal, for once these cells are identified, their vulnerabilities could be studied with the aim of developing better, long lasting cancer therapies.

In a paper just published online in Cell, investigators in the laboratories of Columbia University’s Dana Pe’er and Stanford University’s Garry Nolan describe a new method that takes an important step toward addressing this challenge. As Dr. Pe’er explains, “Biology has come to a point where we suddenly realize there are many more cell types than we ever imagined possible. In this paper, we have created an algorithm that can very robustly identify such subpopulations in a completely automatic and unsupervised way, based purely on high-dimensional single-cell data. This new method makes it possible to discover many new cell subpopulations that we have never seen before.”

Monthly disease risk

Columbia scientists used electronic records of 1.7 million New York City patients to map the statistical relationship between birth month and disease incidence. Image courtesy of Nicholas Tatonetti.

Columbia University Medical Center reports on a new study in the Journal of American Medical Informatics Association led by Nicholas Tatonetti, also an assistant professor in the Department of Systems Biology.

Tracking clones

After identifying T cell clones that react against donated kidney tissue in vitro, new computational methods developed in Yufeng Shen's Lab are used to track their frequency following organ transplant. The findings can help to predict transplant rejection or tolerance.

When a patient receives a kidney transplant, a battle often ensues. In many cases, the recipient’s immune system identifies the transplanted kidney as a foreign invader and mounts an aggressive T cell response to eliminate it, leading to a variety of destructive side effects. To minimize complications, many transplant recipients receive drugs that suppress the immune response. These have their own consequences, however, as they can lead to increased risk of infections. For these reasons, scientists have been working to gain a better understanding of the biological mechanisms that determine transplant tolerance and rejection. This knowledge could potentially improve physicians’ ability to predict the viability of an organ transplant and to provide the best approach to immunosuppression therapy based on individual patients’ immune system profiles.

Yufeng Shen, an assistant professor in the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology and JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, together with Megan Sykes, director of the Columbia Center for Translational Immunology at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, recently took an encouraging step toward this goal. In a paper published in Science Translational Medicine, they report that the deletion of specific donor-resistant T cell clones in the transplant recipient can support tolerance of a new kidney. Critical to this discovery was the development of a new computational genomics approach by the Shen Lab, which makes it possible to track how frequently rare T cell clones develop and how their frequencies change following transplantation. The paper suggests both a general strategy for understanding the causes of transplant rejection and a means of identifying biomarkers for predicting how well a transplant recipient will tolerate a new kidney.

Topology of cancer

The Columbia University Center for Topology of Cancer Evolution and Heterogeneity will combine mathematical approaches from topological data analysis with new single-cell experimental technologies to study cellular diversity in solid tumors. Image courtesy of Raul Rabadan.

The National Cancer Institute’s Physical Sciences in Oncology program has announced the creation of a new center for research and education based at Columbia University. The Center for Topology of Cancer Evolution and Heterogeneity will develop and utilize innovative mathematical and experimental techniques to explore how genetic diversity emerges in the cells that make up solid tumors. In this way it will address a key challenge facing cancer research in the age of precision medicine — how to identify the clonal variants within a tumor that are responsible for its growth, spread, and resistance to therapy. Ultimately, the strategies the Center develops could be used to identify more effective biomarkers of disease and new therapeutic strategies.