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New Insights on How the Reprogramming Factor LIN28 Regulates its Targets
A new study, led by Systems Biology Assistant Professor Chaolin Zhang, sheds light on a critical RNA-binding protein that is widely researched for its role in stem cell biology and its ties to cancer progression in multiple tissues. Published as the cover story in the journal, Molecular Cell, the study reveals how the LIN28 protein suppresses a specific family of microRNAs, called Let-7, which are selectively lost in cancer.
Matching Cancer Patients to Personalized Therapies
A novel N of 1 clinical trial at Columbia University is focusing on rare, untreatable malignancies that have progressed on multiple lines of therapy, with the goal of identifying and providing more effective, customized therapies for patients. The approach is grounded in a computational platform by the Califano Lab to allow accurate identification of proteins that represent critical tumor vulnerabilities and of the drug or drug combination that can most effectively disarm these proteins, thus killing the tumor.
Targeting the Engine Room of the Cancer Cell
Researchers at Columbia University, led by Dr. Andrea Califano, have developed an innovative computational framework that can support personalized cancer treatment by matching individual tumors with the drugs or drug combinations that are most likely to kill them. The new study, published in Nature Genetics, details a proof of concept for a novel analytical platform applicable to any cancer type and validates its predictions on GEP-NET tumors.
Tuuli Lappalainen Receives Leena Peltonen Prize For Excellence In Human Genetics
Dr. Lappalainen, assistant professor of systems biology and faculty at the New York Genome Center, is the recipient of the 2018 Leena Peltonen Prize for Excellence in Human Genetics. Dr. Lappalainen marks the first Finnish genomic researcher to receive the award, honoring one of Finland's most renowned scientists.
Columbia Joins Global Consortium to Advance Precision Cancer Medicine
Columbia University has joined Project GENIE, which brings together leading institutions in cancer research and treatment to provide a repository for the largest possible amount of clinical-grade cancer genomic data and clinical outcomes data. At Columbia, GENIE is being led by Drs. Raul Rabadan of systems biology and Richard Carvajal of medicine.