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Harris WangHarris Wang

Harris Wang has been named a recipient of the prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Dr. Wang is among 102 researchers recognized today by President Barack Obama as the newest recipients of this honor.

The PECASE is considered the United States’ highest award for young scientists and engineers, conferred annually at the White House at the recommendation of participating federal agencies. The award celebrates young researchers at the beginning of their independent research careers who show exceptional promise to lead at the frontiers of twenty-first century science and technology.

Department of Systems Biology bioengineer Harris Wang describes the goals of the Human Genome Project - Write (HGP-write), an international initiative to develop new technologies for synthesizing very large genomes from scratch. 

In June 2016, a consortium of synthetic biologists, industry leaders, ethicists, and others  published a proposal in Science calling for a coordinated effort to synthesize large genomes, including a complete human genome in cell lines. The organizers of the project, called GP-write (for work in model organisms and plants) or sometimes HGP-write (for work in human cell lines), envision it as a successor to the Human Genome Project (retroactively termed HGP-read), which 25 years ago promoted rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology. As the ability to read the genome became more efficient and less expensive, it in turn enabled a revolution in how we study biology and attempt to improve human health. Now, by coordinating the development of new technologies for writing DNA on a whole-genome scale, GP-write aims to have a similarly transformative impact.

Among the paper’s authors were Virginia Cornish and Harris Wang, two members of the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology whose contributions to the field of engineering biology have in part made the idea of writing large-scale DNA sequences imaginable. We spoke with them to learn more about what GP-write hopes to accomplish, its potential benefits, and how the effort is evolving.

Columbia University iGEM Team 2015

The Columbia University 2015 iGEM Team (l-r): Hudson Lee, Suppawat Kongthong, Jacky Cheung, Kenya Velez, Samuel Magaziner, and faculty moderator Harris Wang.

A team of undergraduate students based at Columbia University for the first time participated in this year’s International Genetically Engineered Machine Foundation (iGEM) competition. Supervised by Department of Systems Biology Assistant Professor Harris Wang, the team spent this past summer developing a project that used synthetic biology methods to engineer an edible, probiotic consortium of bacteria that could regulate hunger and digestion. In September they presented their results at the iGEM Giant Jamboree in Boston, MA, where they received a silver medal for their efforts. (For more informtion about their project, see the Columbia iGEM Team website.)

“I think it’s fantastic that this ambitious group of undergraduates worked so hard to represent Columbia University on this international stage,” says Dr. Wang. “Columbia has one of the great undergraduate colleges, and now that we have a critical mass of interested students and faculty laboratories with expertise in synthetic biology, we think iGEM offers a valuable opportunity to compete with and learn from teams at other leading institutions.”

Gut-Brain Microbiota
A grant from the Office of Naval Research will support the development of three foundational synthetic biology technologies for engineering the human gut microbiota.

Harris Wang, an assistant professor in the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology, has been selected for the Office of Naval Research 2015 Young Investigators Program. This highly selective program promotes the development of early-career academic scientists whose research shows exceptional promise and creativity. With the support of this award, Dr. Wang will extend his research in the field of synthetic biology to develop new technologies for engineering the gut microbiome, the ecosystem of bacteria that inhabit the human digestive system. These new methods, Wang anticipates, could provide new ways of designing communities of different microbial species and ultimately modulating interactions between the gut, the immune system, and the brain.

Rodney Rothstein
Rodney Rothstein

The Columbia University Department of Systems Biology congratulates Rodney Rothstein on his election to the National Academy of Sciences. The NAS is a private, non-profit society of distinguished scholars that provides independent, objective advice to the nation on matters related to science and technology. Scientists elected to the NAS are chosen by their peers in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

We are pleased to announce that Columbia University Medical Center professors Oliver Hobert, Richard Mann, and Rodney Rothstein have been named to interdisciplinary appointments in the Department of Systems Biology. The addition of this new expertise will expand the breadth of science currently being explored in the Department, enhance educational opportunities for students, facilitate new collaborations, and promote the integration of systems biology perspectives and methods into research being conducted elsewhere in the university.

Harris Wang

As a graduate student in George Church’s lab at Harvard University, Harris Wang developed MAGE, a revolutionary tool for the field of synthetic biology that made it possible to introduce genomic mutations into E. coli cells in a highly specific and targeted way. Now an Assistant Professor in the Columbia University Department of Systems Biology, Dr. Wang recently published a paper in ACS Synthetic Biology that introduces an important advance in the MAGE technology. The new technique, called (MO)-MAGE, uses microarrays to engineer pools of oligonucleotides that, once amplified and integrated into a genome, can generate thousands or even millions of highly controlled mutations simultaneously. This new method offers a cost-effective way for designing and producing large numbers of genomic variants and provides an efficient platform for experimentally exploring genome-wide landscapes of mutations in bacteria and optimizing the organisms’ biochemical capabilities.

In the following interview, Dr. Wang explains the origins of the new technology, and discusses what he sees as the remarkable potential it holds for both basic biological research and industrial applications of synthetic biology.

A panel at the Helix Center, titled "Synthetic and Systems Biology: Reinventing the Code of Life included Columbia University professors Saeed Tavazoie and Andrea Califano, as well as Michael Hecht (Professor of Chemistry, Princeton University), Mark Fishman (President, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research), Christopher Mason (Assistant Professor of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute for Computational Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College), and Michael Waldholz (Medical Science Writer and Media Consultant).

Advances in genomics and the development of new technologies over the past decade have given biologists the ability to engineer DNA to perform specific functions. This emerging science, called synthetic biology, holds great potential for a number of applications, and experiments have already been done to reprogram algae to produce biofuels, design bacteria that can sense and consume toxic substances, and use living cells to manufacture compounds that can be used as drugs.

Synthetic biology has emerged in parallel with systems biology, but in many ways the two sciences are closely intertwined. As systems biology improves our mechanistic understanding of how biology functions at the molecular level, synthetic biology is taking this knowledge to push biology in new directions, from synthesizing molecules using biology all the way to synthesizing new forms of biological life.

In a public roundtable discussion at the Helix Center in New York City, Columbia University Department of Systems Biology professors Saeed Tavazoie  and Andrea Califano  joined a panel of experts in discussing the intersection of systems and synthetic biology, and the role that these two disciplines will play in the development of the biological and biomedical sciences in the coming years.