News

Raul Rabadan
Raul Rabadan

Systems Biology Professor Raul Rabadan, Phd , has been awarded a Philip A. Sharp Innovation in Collaboration award from Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) , a group established by film and media leaders to fund cancer research projects that have the potential to quickly deliver new therapies to patients. Dr. Rabadan has received the award jointly with collaborator Dan A. Landau, MD, PhD, of Weill Cornell Medicine.

A theoretical physicist whose expertise lies in the cross section of mathematical genomics, tumor evolution, and cancer research, Dr. Rabadan will work together with Dr. Landau on their winning project, “Cupid-seq—high throughput transcriptomic spatial mapping of immune-tumor interactions in the micro-environment.”  The investigators will devise a novel sequencing technique and computational method for better understanding immune recognition mechanism in glioblastoma. Dr. Rabadan is currently a principal investigator on the SU2C-National Science Foundation Drug Combination Convergence Team and Dr. Lau is a 2016 recipient of a SU2C Innovative Research Grant.

No Read Left Behind

Gradually eliminating low-affinity binding sites identified by NRLB (from left to right) results in a gradual reduction of gene expression (white); Credit: Mann Lab/Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute

As reported  by the Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University researchers have developed a new computational method for deciphering DNA’s most well-kept secrets, and this new algorithm may help find the links between genes and disease. 

The researchers included lead PI at Zuckerman  Richard Mann , PhD, with collaborator, Harmen Bussemaker , PhD, both faculty members of the Department of Systems Biology. They recently published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .

Andrea Califano
Andrea Califano, Dr, chair of Columbia's Department of Systems Biology

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) has awarded Andrea Califano, Dr, a new grant in support of his work to develop a comprehensive library of regulatory interactions within molecularly defined cellular populations and molecular determinants (master regulators) of individual cells’ state. This will arm scientists with a unique resource to study biology at the individual cell level and to gain further insight into the fundamental understanding of molecularly distinct cell types.

With the support of CZI, founded by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, Dr. Califano, chair of Columbia’s Department of Systems Biology, and his group will apply their computational methods that accurately and systematically measure and analyze regulatory interaction at the single cell level to elucidate distinct cellular states and to establish both cell-state markers, as well as the proteins that are causally responsible for implementing that state. 

Harmen and Tuuli
Harmen Bussemaker (left) and Tuuli Lappalainen

Harmen Bussemaker, PhD, and Tuuli Lappalainen, PhD, have received an inaugural Roy and Diana Vagelos Precision Medicine Pilot Award for a collaboration that will bridge quantitative genetics and mechanistic biology to obtain a mechanistic understanding of regulatory effects of genetic variants in humans.

Drs. Bussemaker and Lappalainen, both faculty in Columbia’s Department of Systems Biology, represent one of three winning proposals out of a pool of 56 applications. Their project titled, “Elucidating the tissue-specific molecular mechanisms underlying disease associations through integrative analysis of genetic variation and molecular network data”, will help to advance Columbia University’s efforts in precision medicine basic science research. 

Organoids bladder cancer

Organoids created from the bladder cancers of patients mimic the characteristics of each patient’s tumor and may be used in the future to identify the best treatment for each patient. Images: Michael Shen

Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers have created patient-specific bladder cancer organoids that mimic many of the characteristics of actual tumors. As reported by CUIMC, the use of organoids, tiny 3-D spheres derived from a patient’s own tumor, may be useful in the future to guide treatment of patients.

The study was published April 5 in the online edition of Cell.