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A panel at the Helix Center, titled "Synthetic and Systems Biology: Reinventing the Code of Life included Columbia University professors Saeed Tavazoie and Andrea Califano, as well as Michael Hecht (Professor of Chemistry, Princeton University), Mark Fishman (President, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research), Christopher Mason (Assistant Professor of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute for Computational Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College), and Michael Waldholz (Medical Science Writer and Media Consultant).

Advances in genomics and the development of new technologies over the past decade have given biologists the ability to engineer DNA to perform specific functions. This emerging science, called synthetic biology, holds great potential for a number of applications, and experiments have already been done to reprogram algae to produce biofuels, design bacteria that can sense and consume toxic substances, and use living cells to manufacture compounds that can be used as drugs.

Synthetic biology has emerged in parallel with systems biology, but in many ways the two sciences are closely intertwined. As systems biology improves our mechanistic understanding of how biology functions at the molecular level, synthetic biology is taking this knowledge to push biology in new directions, from synthesizing molecules using biology all the way to synthesizing new forms of biological life.

In a public roundtable discussion at the Helix Center in New York City, Columbia University Department of Systems Biology professors Saeed Tavazoie  and Andrea Califano  joined a panel of experts in discussing the intersection of systems and synthetic biology, and the role that these two disciplines will play in the development of the biological and biomedical sciences in the coming years.