Andrea Califano

News

A Systems Biology Approach to Target Pancreatic Cancer
Andrea Califano, Dr, chair of the Department of Systems Biology, has been featured in the “Promising Science” column of “Let’s Win! Pancreatic Cancer”. Dr. Califano discusses how systems biology is being used in cancer research in the development of better treatments by precisely targeting proteins called master regulators, instead of mutations. “I’m a systems biologist and we look at things differently than traditional biologists,” he says. “With systems biology we want to take cancer apart and see how it works, and the only way we can do that is by developing accurate computational models of how the cancer cell works.”
DSB Retreat Boasts Diverse Research, Spotlights Young Investigators
Each year the Department of Systems Biology community comes together for an off-campus retreat to discuss science, share ongoing research and to network. During this year's two-day program, held in Ellenville, NY, research presentations were primarily delivered by young investigators, shining a light on the ongoing work by our graduate students and post-docs.
Behind the Technique: Systems Biology with Andrea Califano
At the 2019 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), Dr. Andrea Califano sat down with BioTechniques News for an overview on the field of systems biology and its impact in cancer research and in precision medicine. Dr. Califano is a pioneering researcher in the field of systems biology whose expertise is in developing innovative, systematic approaches to identify the molecular factors that lead to cancer progression and to the emergence of drug resistance at the single-cell level. Dr. Califano is the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and founding chair of the Department of Systems Biology at Columbia.
Targeting Cancer and Careers: Precision Medicine
In the field of oncology, innovations continue to grow rapidly in precision, or targeted medicine, as clinicians seek to find better treatments for specific kinds of cancer, rather than take a blanket approach to treating patients. This emerging direction in medicine and cancer research has also given birth to a flood of new jobs in previously unseen areas such as business, translational medicine and genetic counseling. Science magazine recently spoke to Andrea Califano, Dr, founding chair of the Department of Systems Biology and a pioneering researcher in this space, to get his thoughts about the rapidly growing field of precision medicine.
Prostate Cancer Grant Spotlights Columbia’s Aim to Deliver Precision Cancer Medicine
Columbia University Irving Medical Center experts in prostate cancer will lead a new team research project that tests a novel approach for personalized cancer treatment. The two-year project, funded by a $1 million Challenge Award from the Prostate Cancer Foundation, combines computational methods for targeted drug therapy, single-cell RNA sequencing and novel cancer immunotherapy. The combined approaches are behind a proof-of-concept clinical trial for patients at Bronx VA with lethal metastatic prostate cancer.