Raul Rabadan

Raul Rabadan

Titles

Professor, Department of Systems Biology

Affiliations

Department of Systems Biology
Department of Biomedical Informatics
Program for Mathematical Genomics
Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
Center for Cancer Systems Therapeutics
JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center

Phone

(212) 851-5141

Raul Rabadan is a Professor in the Department of Systems Biology, with a joint appointment in Biomedical Informatics. He is the director of the Program for Mathematical Genomics (PMG) and the Center for Topology of Cancer Evolution and Heterogeneity. He established PMG in the fall of 2017 with the goal of bringing together scientists, mathematicians and researchers from multiple disciplines to work toward a quantitative understanding of complex biological systems. From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Rabadan was a fellow at the Theoretical Physics Division at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in Geneva, Switzerland. In 2003 he joined the Physics Group of the School of Natural Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study. Previously, Dr. Rabadan was the Martin A. and Helen Chooljian Member at The Simons Center for Systems Biology at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. He has been named one of Popular Science's Brilliant 10 (2010), a Stewart Trust Fellow (2013), and he received the Harold and Golden Lamport Award at Columbia University (2014). Dr. Rabadan’s current interest focuses on uncovering patterns of evolution in biological systems—in particular, RNA viruses and cancer.

More News

News

Why Some Brain Tumors Respond to Immunotherapy
Fewer than 1 in 10 patients with glioblastoma­ respond to immunotherapy, which has shown remarkable success in the past few years in treating a variety of aggressive cancers. But there has been no way to know in advance which glioblastoma patients will respond. In a study, led by Raul Rabadan, PhD, researches have learned why some glioblastomas—the most common type of brain cancer—respond to immunotherapy. The findings could help identify patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment with immunotherapy drugs and lead to the development of more broadly effective treatments.
Columbia Joins Global Consortium to Advance Precision Cancer Medicine
Columbia University has joined Project GENIE, which brings together leading institutions in cancer research and treatment to provide a repository for the largest possible amount of clinical-grade cancer genomic data and clinical outcomes data. At Columbia, GENIE is being led by Drs. Raul Rabadan of systems biology and Richard Carvajal of medicine.
Raul Rabadan Wins Stand Up to Cancer Award for Accelerated Cancer Research
Dr. Rabadan has won a Sharp Innovation Award from Stand Up to Cancer, and with collaborator, Dr. Dan Landau of Weill Cornell, the two investigators will work on a novel sequencing technique and computational method for better understanding immune recognition mechanism in glioblastoma.
Symposium Spotlights Advancements in Translational Cancer Research
The recent Cancer Genomics Symposium featured talks by leading computational biologists, physicists, engineers, mathematicians, and oncologists, and explored important research grounded in cancer genomics and mathematical data analysis.
At the Intersection of Math and Genomics
Introducing the Program for Mathematical Genomics, a new research hub at Columbia where computer scientists, mathematicians, evolutionary biologists and physicists can come together to uncover quantitative techniques to tackle fundamental biomedical problems. The interdisciplinary program aims to advance research in an emerging, rapidly growing field.