Raul Rabadan

Raul Rabadan

Titles

Gerald and Janet Carrus Professor
Professor, Departments of Systems Biology and Biomedical Informatics
Director, Program for Mathematical Genomics
Co-leader, Genomics and Epigenomics Research Program, Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center

Affiliations

Department of Systems Biology
Department of Biomedical Informatics
Program for Mathematical Genomics
Institute for Cancer Genetics
Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
Center for Cancer Systems Therapeutics
JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center

Phone

(212) 851-5141

Raul Rabadan is the Gerald and Janet Carrus Professor in the Departments of Systems BiologyBiomedical Informatics and Surgery at Columbia University. He is the director of the Program for Mathematical Genomics (PMG) and the Center for Topology of Cancer Evolution and Heterogeneity. He established PMG in the fall of 2017 with the goal of bringing together scientists, mathematicians and researchers from multiple disciplines to work toward a quantitative understanding of complex biological systems. From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Rabadan was a fellow at the Theoretical Physics Division at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in Geneva, Switzerland. In 2003 he joined the Physics Group of the School of Natural Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study. Previously, Dr. Rabadan was the Martin A. and Helen Chooljian Member at The Simons Center for Systems Biology at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. He has been named one of Popular Science's Brilliant 10 (2010), a Stewart Trust Fellow (2013), and he received the Harold and Golden Lamport Award at Columbia University (2014). Dr. Rabadan’s current interest focuses on uncovering patterns of evolution in biological systems—in particular, RNA viruses and cancer.

More News

News

Raul Rabadan, PhD, receives grant from the National Institute on Aging
Adolfo Ferrando, MD, PhD, and Raul Rabadan, PhD, Institute for Cancer Genetics: $2,500,000 over five years from the National Institute on Aging for “The role of PHF6 in the control of hematopoietic stem cell aging.”
Columbia’s Edward P. Evans Center for Myelodysplastic Syndromes Awards Inaugural Grants and Fellowships
Four research teams at Columbia University have been awarded the inaugural Edward P. Evans Center for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) Pilot Awards and Fellowships. To support their research, each team will receive a one-year $100,000 grant for the Edward P. Evans Center Pilot Awards and a two-year $60,000/year grant for the fellowships. The two pilot projects are being led by principal investigators Pawel Muranski, MD, assistant professor of medicine and of pathology and cell biology at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons (VP&S); Amer Assal, MD, assistant professor of medicine at VP&S; and Raul Rabadan, PhD, professor of systems biology and of biomedical informatics at VP&S.
Raul Rabadan, PhD, Named Highly Cited Researcher
Congratulations to Raul Rabadan, PhD, professor of systems biology and founding director of Columbia's Program for Mathematical Genomics, who has recently been named a 2020 Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate. Overall, Columbia University is home to a total of 45 Highly Cited Researchers in 2020.
New Book on Understanding the Novel Coronavirus
Raul Rabadan, PhD, professor of systems biology and director of Columbia's Program for Mathematical Genomics, has authored a new book that provides readers an accessible overview that quells misinformation about the novel coronavirus, and discusses its origin, causes, and spread.
Book Offers Intro to Rapidly Growing Field of Topological Data Analysis
The deluge of data in the diverse field of biology comes with it the challenge of extracting meaningful information from large biological data sets. A new book, coauthored by Drs. Raul Rabadan and Andrew J. Blumberg, titled Topological Data Analysis for Genomics and Evolution, introduces central ideas and techniques of topological data analysis and aims to explain in detail a number of specific applications to biology.