Raul Rabadan

News

Raul Rabadan, PhD, Named Highly Cited Researcher
Congratulations to Raul Rabadan, PhD, professor of systems biology and founding director of Columbia's Program for Mathematical Genomics, who has recently been named a 2020 Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate. Overall, Columbia University is home to a total of 45 Highly Cited Researchers in 2020.
New Book on Understanding the Novel Coronavirus
Raul Rabadan, PhD, professor of systems biology and director of Columbia's Program for Mathematical Genomics, has authored a new book that provides readers an accessible overview that quells misinformation about the novel coronavirus, and discusses its origin, causes, and spread.
Book Offers Intro to Rapidly Growing Field of Topological Data Analysis
The deluge of data in the diverse field of biology comes with it the challenge of extracting meaningful information from large biological data sets. A new book, coauthored by Drs. Raul Rabadan and Andrew J. Blumberg, titled Topological Data Analysis for Genomics and Evolution, introduces central ideas and techniques of topological data analysis and aims to explain in detail a number of specific applications to biology.
Highly Cited Researchers
Congratulations to Drs. Raul Rabadan and Xuebing Wu who were recently named a Highly Cited Researcher, according to the 2019 list from the Web of Science Group. Overall, Columbia University ranked 15th on the list of global institutions, with a total of 47 Highly Cited Researchers.
Detailed Map Gives Scientists a New Window into how Human-Infecting Viruses Work
Columbia University biologists leveraged a computational method to map protein-protein interactions between all known human-infecting viruses and the cells they infect. The method, along with the data that it generated, has spawned a wealth of information toward improving our understanding of how viruses manipulate the cells that they infect and cause disease. Among its findings, the work uncovered a role for estrogen receptor in regulating Zika Virus infection, as well as links between cancer and the human papillomavirus. The research, led by Dr. Sagi Shapira, appears Aug. 29 in the journal, Cell.