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The Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics (C2B2) has begun a major upgrade of its Advanced Research Computing core.

In the coming months, C2B2 will launch a new computing cluster that boasts 212 teraflops of performance. This figure is nearly nine times the total computing capacity of its current computing platform, called Titan. The new system will have 6,336 CPU-cores, over 70,000 CUDA-cores (GPU), and 22 TB of total system memory. The primary source of funding for this new system is a High-End Instrumentation grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The 6th Annual DREAM competition, the 7th Annual RECOMB Satellite Conference on Systems Biology, the 8th Annual RECOMB Satellite Conference on Regulatory Genomics, and the IDIBELL Conference on Cancer Informatics will be held jointly at the IDIBELL institute, in Barcelona, Spain, on October 14-19, 2011. The four conferences aim to bring together computational and experimental scientists in the area of regulatory genomics and systems biology, to discuss current research directions, latest findings, and establish new collaborations towards a systems-level understanding of gene regulation, with particular emphasis on cancer. Click here for more information. 

Saeed Tavazoie, Professor at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Columbia University, has joined C2B2. Dr. Tavazoie's research focuses on understanding the organizing principles that underlie the evolution and function of molecular networks. At one scale, his work uses large-scale genome-wide observations to reveal the nuts and bolts of these networks and to understand how they come together to orchestrate biological behavior. At the other extreme, it aims to achieve a holistic understanding of function by considering the native ecological context in which these networks have evolved. At the highest level, his goal is to understand how molecular networks embody an internal representation of the outside world and facilitate adaptive behaviors.

Dr. Tavazoie's research focuses on these problems in the context of transcriptional regulatory and genetic networks of organisms ranging from bacteria to human. In addition to using traditional experimental methods, his lab develops and employs novel technologies for making genome-wide observations, together with computational and analytic tools required to turn these observations into predictive models of the underlying biology.

Professor Tavazoie received his PhD from Harvard Medical School in 2000. He joins C2B2 and Columbia University from Princeton where he was Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics.

Yufeng Shen, Assistant Professor at the Department of Biomedical Informatics, has joined C2B2 and the Columbia Initiative in Systems Biology. Dr. Shen's research focuses on the development and application of computational methods for the study of human genetics and disease. Specifically, his group is working in four areas, including high-throughput sequencing and de novo assembly, genetic mapping of human diseases, autoimmunity and major histocompatibility complex, pharmacogenomics and personalized treatment.

Dr. Shen received his PhD in computational biology from the Human Genome Sequencing Center at Baylor College of Medicine in 2007. In 2008 he joined Columbia University as a postdoctoral fellow.

Sagi Shapira, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, has joined the Columbia Initiative in Systems Biology (CISB). Dr. Shapira's research focuses on deciphering the genetic and molecular circuitry that is at the interface of host-pathogen interactions. The goal is to understand how this circuitry controls cellular responses to infection, imparts selective pressure on viruses and affects disease progression. A mechanistic understanding of these relationships will provide important insights into cellular machinery that control basic cell biology and will have broad implications in human translational immunology and infectious disease research.

Shapira received his PhD in immuno-parasitology under the guidance of Christopher A. Hunter at the University of Pennsylvania in 2005 and a Masters in Public Health at Yale University in 1999. He joins Columbia from the Broad Institute where he has a postdoctoral fellow.

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