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Tal Korem, PhD
Dr. Tal Korem

Tal Korem, PhD, has been named a CIFAR Azrieli Global Scholar, a fellowship that supports leading early-career researchers in science and technology. 

Dr. Korem is an assistant professor of systems biology with a joint appointment in obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons, and a faculty member of the Program for Mathematical Genomics . As a global scholar, he is joining CIFAR’s Humans and the Microbiome research program, where his work will focus on harnessing human microbial communities to identify and develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

CIFAR’s  Azrieli Global Scholars program supports its fellows through funding and mentorship, emphasizing essential network and professional skills development. The scholars join CIFAR research programs for a two-year period where they collaborate with fellows and brainstorm new approaches to pressing science and technology problems. Research topics are diverse, ranging from bio-solar energy and visual consciousness to engineered proteins and the immune system. 

Dr. Korem is one of 14 researchers out of an applicant pool of 217 selected by the Canadian-based nonprofit organization. This year’s cohort represents citizenship in eight countries and appointments in institutions from Canada, the U.S.,  Israel, Australia, the Netherlands, and Spain.

-Melanie A. Farmer

Dr. Raul Rabadan is leading a global research project as part of a new grant from the Pancreatic Cancer Collective to identify high-risk factors of pancreatic cancer. (Courtesy of Stand Up to Cancer)

A global team of researchers led by theoretical physicist Raul Rabadan, PhD, professor of systems biology at Columbia’s Vagelos School of Physicians and Surgeons, and Núria Malats, MD, PhD, head of the Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), are working to develop a comprehensive computational framework that will identify high-risk factors for pancreatic cancer.  

Armed with a new two-year, $1 million grant from the Pancreatic Cancer Collective, the team intends to attack pancreatic cancer research from multiple disciplines—genomics, mathematics and medicine—to provide an integrated, computational approach to studying genomic, environmental and immune factors that could identify populations at high risk of pancreatic cancer. The need for deeper understanding of the contributing factors to this lethal disease is pressing, as pancreatic cancer is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality within the next decade. 

Rabadan-led Team for Pancreatic Cancer Collective
Drs. Raul Rabadan and Nuria Malats

Faculty

Ivan Corwin

Professor, Mathematics

Professor, Mathematics

Faculty

Tal Korem

Assistant Professor, Department of Systems Biology

Assistant Professor, Department of Systems Biology

Feb 7-8 Cancer Genomics Symposium

Pictured above, Adolfo Ferrando (left), professor of pediatrics and of pathology and cell biology at Columbia, with Luis Arnes, associate research scientist and first-place winner of the symposium's poster competition; For photos from the symposium, visit the gallery page . Credit: Lydia Lee Photography

A multidisciplinary team of researchers across Columbia University have been busy addressing the complex challenges in basic and translational cancer research. Faculty and investigators are bridging their expertise in fields ranging from mathematics, biology, and engineering to physics, genomics, and chemistry to develop innovative approaches to better understand, for instance, cancer disease progression, drug resistance, and the systems-wide network of tumor evolution.

Central to this ongoing work is research grounded in cancer genomics and mathematical data analysis explored during a two-day conference Feb. 7-8 co-hosted by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) centers at Columbia University Medical Center, Cornell University, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. (Visit the Rabadan Lab YouTube Channel for video of the symposium).

"Genomics is becoming an important tool for the quantitative study of biological systems,” says Raul Rabadan, PhD , professor of systems biology at Columbia and director of the Center for Topology of Cancer Evolution and Heterogeneity and of the Program for Mathematical Genomics . “This meeting organized by four different NCI centers addressed some of the important challenges and new perspectives on the quantitative understanding of cancer using genomics tools.”

Faculty

Andrew Yates

Professor, Pathology and Cell Biology

Professor, Pathology and Cell Biology

Faculty

Iuliana Ionita-Laza

Associate Professor, Biostatistics

Associate Professor, Biostatistics

Faculty

David Blei

Professor, Computer Science and Statistics

Professor, Computer Science and Statistics

Faculty

Guy Sella

Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences

Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences

Faculty

Molly Przeworski

Professor, Department of Biological Sciences

Professor, Department of Biological Sciences

Faculty

Chris Wiggins

Associate Professor, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics

Associate Professor, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics

Faculty

Yufeng Shen

Associate Professor, Department of Systems Biology
Associate Director

Faculty

Raul Rabadan

Professor, Department of Systems Biology

Co-director, Next-Generation Sequencing

Faculty

Itsik Pe'er

Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science

Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science

Faculty

Harmen Bussemaker

Professor, Department of Biological Sciences

Professor, Department of Biological Sciences

Faculty

Andrea Califano

Chair, Department of Systems Biology
Director, JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center